Breaking Bad

Sir_Gallonhead
Sir_Gallonhead

I'm rewatching Breaking Bad after almost two years of first watching it, and I started noticing some things that I guess I was too stupid to pick up on when first watching.

It's just one thing really, but I'm picking up on it now.

I noticed that a lot of times in the first season, the characters constantly bring Walt's manhood and ability to be a provider into question. Like after Walt tells Hank and Mary that he has cancer, Hank says that whatever happens, he'll take care of his family for him. Or when Skyler whispers her question about if she can use the credit card as a method of payment to the hospital when she has previously told Walt that they can't use the credit card, signifying that they need help from an outside source and can't just rely on Walt. Same for when Skyler suggested that they should borrow money from Hank, Walt's mother, or his friend from Gray Matter (the life Walt could've had). Or when Skyler says she'd go back to working again.

Lots of instances implying he's not man enough, and I suppose I was able to notice it now because I can relate.

Then Jesse comes along bringing him money from the batch (that Walt cooked) that he sold. This reminds Walt that "hey, you can show everyone that you are a provider and you have a way to do it".

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farquit
farquit

@Sir_Gallonhead
It was due to his deteriorating health. You're projecting.

SomethingNew
SomethingNew

Okay, I'm noticing it even more.
Like when Walt Jr. called Hank instead of Walt when he got caught for asking a cop to buy him beer, like Walt isn't the one to look for when you need help. 10 times worse since it's his son.

askme
askme

You know what a real man does? He ignores arbitrary definitions of manhood and does what he knows is right. It sounds like Walt wasn't man enough.

hairygrape
hairygrape

@farquit
I thought that, too, at first.
But why did he refuse to accept money from elliot and get mad?
Then his own son tells him he's a pussy.

@askme
don't follow arbitrary definitions of manhood
according to this arbitrary definition of manhood

Methshot
Methshot

@hairygrape
I mean the dude was dying from cancer, on top of that his marriage is in the shitter as well as his relationship with his son and the obvious fact that he's a meth dealer. He was probably just losing his mind

Methnerd
Methnerd

@SomethingNew
Walt Jr.
Fuck that disloyal gimp. He was always a whiny hipster douche but showed his true colors in the last season. Most people remember it wrong - that it was after discovering Hank had been killed he disowned his father - but it was actually before that, when he learned Walt was making meth to support his family. "Oh wow my Dad became a criminal just to give me millions of $$ for after he died, fuck that guy." F-f-flynn never respected his father and the fact he would throw him under the bus based on a disfunctional prohibitive law shows just what a worthless turnip he really is.

TreeEater
TreeEater

Oh, episode 5, season 1, Hank says "Maybe Walt wants to die like a man". Mary says he should have a say in his future.Skyler doesn't allow Walt to speak because he doesn't have the pillow, but two minutes later everyone is talking regardless of it, except for Walt.

It is about his manhood.

Skullbone
Skullbone

@Methshot
It isn't about that. That all came after the fact.
He simply realized that he was living like a square all his life, the he could've had the potential to be something great, but he's living like a domesticised cat instead of the king of the jungle of a lion he ought to be.

Another example is when the guys at the party ask him what he does for a living, and he says that teaches, then they ask which university and he's quiet.

Just rewatch the first five episodes.

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

Also, Breaking Bad's pace is WAY faster than Better Call Saul's.
An episode of BB feels like a season of of BCS.

It took one episode for Walt to break bad, while Saul still hasn't fully.

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

@lostmypassword
It took one episode for Walt to break bad, while Saul still hasn't fully.
Jews gonna whitewash.

Mortality was the biggest challenge to his manhood. The stuff you're describing was to amplify that so his ridiculous change in behavior would be believable, and there was the comedic value of humiliating the "straight man" character. I remember the family meeting/talking pillow scene as being really very funny.

TechHater
TechHater

ITT: We point out one of the main subtexts of Breaking Bad as though making insightful observations.

I guess it's no secret why films are actively dumbed down for American audiences.

MPmaster
MPmaster

@TechHater
as though making insightful observations
Literally first line in the OP:
I was too stupid to pick up on

American audiences
Although I'd like to put this on the Burgers, but it's more fun to point out your mental gymnastics shenanigans.

PackManBrainlure
PackManBrainlure

@lostmypassword

It took one episode for Walt to break bad, while Saul still hasn't fully.

Because saul was always a criminal, while walt was an honest man for like 90% of his life

Saul goes in reverse, he's a criminal trying to go legit but he can't let go of his conman past

BlogWobbles
BlogWobbles

@PackManBrainlure
The writers have already given Saul his moments to break, with an "s".
He was already legit at the beginning of the show, but they're making him flip-flop between the two.
You can see it in the fandom, people are getting bored of Saul scenes and excited for Mike ones. He's supposed to be the titular character.

whereismyname
whereismyname

sage 14

likme
likme

@Skullbone
He says as much the last time he speaks to Skyler. She thinks he was going to say that he did it for the family, but he says he did it for himself.

@lostmypassword
My thoughts exactly. It's surprising just how little has happened so far. Even by the end of BB season 1 Walt was well on the way to becoming a drug lord.

Flameblow
Flameblow

This is ny far the worst interpretation/projection I have ever read. You just gave me leukemia

Booteefool
Booteefool

@Methnerd
this post though.
A+

lostmypassword
lostmypassword

@Sir_Gallonhead
Search masculinity in Breaking Bad also read this book
Cable Guys: Television and Masculinities in the 21st Century by Amanda D. Lotz
From the meth-dealing but devoted family man Walter White of AMC’s Breaking Bad, to the part-time basketball coach, part-time gigolo Ray Drecker of HBO’s Hung, depictions of male characters perplexed by societal expectations of men and anxious about changing American masculinity have become standard across the television landscape.

Engaging with a wide variety of shows, including The League, Dexter, and Nip/Tuck, among many others, Amanda D. Lotz identifies the gradual incorporation of second-wave feminism into prevailing gender norms as the catalyst for the contested masculinities on display in contemporary cable dramas.

Examining the emergence of “male-centered serials” such as The Shield, Rescue Me, and Sons of Anarchy and the challenges these characters face in negotiating modern masculinities, Lotz analyzes how these shows combine feminist approaches to fatherhood and marriage with more traditional constructions of masculine identity that emphasize men’s role as providers. She explores the dynamics of close male friendships both in groups, as in Entourage and Men of a Certain Age, wherein characters test the boundaries between the homosocial and homosexual in their relationships with each other, and in the dyadic intimacy depicted in Boston Legal and Scrubs. Cable Guys provides a much needed look into the under-considered subject of how constructions of masculinity continue to evolve on television.

Evilember
Evilember

BumP

SniperGod
SniperGod

@Sir_Gallonhead
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'pl

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